06 September 2013

Black-Clad Avenger


by Dixon Hill
Image credit: sad444 / 123RF Stock Photo

For today's blog, I simply can't think of ANYTHING that could top this story from the L.A. Times.  So, without further adieu, I suggest you click on the link below.  I couldn't make this stuff up (though I wish I had).

http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-wn-mexican-border-city-avenger-20130903,0,4220840.story

See you in two weeks,
--Dix

6 comments:

Leigh Lundin said...

It has the makings of a Batgirl plot or… wasn't there a Dirty Harry plot about a blonde who tracked down baddies?

> So, without further adieu…

Ah, clever word play…

Elizabeth Zelvin said...

I'm rooting for the Huntress, as long as the bus drivers killed were actually the rapists. Not a word about whether the victims had been suspected.

Dixon Hill said...

Glad to hear you liked the pun, Liegh — sort of like that Shakespearian play: Much “Adieu” About Nothing. LOL And, yesterday, the way my computer was acting up, I nearly bid it “Ado!” with a sledgehammer! LOL

You might also chuckle to know that I nearly used a Batgirl-type piece of artwork on the post, thinking the same way you did. Perhaps, however, I should have used a shot of Sondra Locke in Sudden Impact, the role in which she played sort of a “Dirty Harriet” to Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry.

Elizabeth, my reaction is nearly identical to yours. You can’t help but feel for these folks, and to think that this may be a case where “rough justice” is the only chance at any type of justice — yet, if either of the targeted bus drivers were actually innocent …

Anonymous said...

I don't think anything can be made of whether or not the men were "suspects." It's clear there was no real investigation going on, so there could be no "suspects" and never would be -- which is why she acted. I think the people they interviewed who said it's "interesting" that raping and killing (a lot of them were killed!) women got almost NO attention from law enforcement. But killing men did. And crimes against helpless, literally poor passengers who have no other transportation got no attention. But crimes against the people who have all
the control in that situation did. "Helpless public servants" those bus drivers who committed this crime were most certainly *not*. They were taking advantage of a situation in which helpless women were in their power and a government had demonstrated its unwillingness to do anything about it. If this woman is taking the risk to do this act, she knows precisely who she's targeting. It's like this vigilante women who've had to do the same thing with rapists in India. Sometimes women have to defend ourselves when no one else will do it. Sometimes I think we worry too much about the rights and fears of the wrong people. My guess is the bus drivers who expressed fear are also guilty and know it. If not, if they are innocent and in fear, then they have simply "joined the crowd". For the women in this area are walking in fear every moment of their lives, and innocent as can be. If there is fear for those who are innocent, then at least let everyone bear the burden equally -- not just one gender and one class. This woman is my hero.

Louis A. Willis said...

The huntress got the attention of the authorities, good for now. But when things die down, will they still put undercover cops on the buses to protect the women?

Dixon Hill said...

I think you make several good points, Anonymous. A woman who’d been attacked would surely remember her attacker’s face, assuming it was uncovered.

But, I think there may yet be a question – reading the article – about whether the “black-clad avenger” is actually a woman, or perhaps a disguised man. “She” could actually be the father or husband of one of the women who’d been attacked. Hence, the avenger might not really know which driver(s) to target. In such a scenario, for instance, a male relative of a murdered woman may have reduced the pool of drivers to a possible two, and decided to kill them both, in order to ensure he got the offender. If the other driver neither participated in, nor implicitly condoned, this sort of behavior, killing him would be quite wrong imho.

Louis, I believe your comment’s concern is quite justified, given that authorities evidently didn’t bother to place undercover personnel on busses to protect women in the first place, but rather to protect bus drivers – something Anon is also probably quite concerned about (as am I).